How to Survive Army Basic Combat Training

The Army requires all officer candidates (who are not prior service enlisted) to attend Basic Combat Training (“boot camp”) prior to moving on to OCS.

Phrases to know before Army Basic Training

army basic training recruits yelling

The following is advice from Josh Hartmann and lists the top terminology and phrases that you need to know before shipping out to basic training. You can download the Sandboxx app before basic training here.

Army Basic Training Phrases

FNG – Fucking new guy
High-Speed – Can be good or bad
◦ Good: We’re going to be doing some high-speed shit today!
◦ Bad: If they address you as high-speed (It means you’re a know-it-all or trying too hard)
Down Range – After in-processing, where you’re actual basic begins
Front Leaning Rest Position – Pushup position
Blue Falcon – BF aka Buddy Fucker. Do not be this.
CQ – Charge of Quarters. Basically, just guard duty/secretary.
Recycled – Start basic all over
TMC – Troop medical center
Company – Large group of platoons
Platoon – 40-60 people, your main group in basic
Roster Number – Number assigned to you in your platoon.
Hook and Loop – Velcro
Hundred Mile An Hour Tape – Duct tape
Getting smoked – Forced PT until you can’t move anymore

Sandboxx is a mobile app that enables comms to exist throughout the military journey. Sandboxx enables those in uniform and their families stay connected like never before possible. Sandboxx Letters continues the mission by giving loved ones the ability to send physical mail to those in basic training, boot camp or on deployment. Learn more about how Sandboxx is revolutionising the way our military community thrives at www.sandboxx.us and download the app here,www.sandboxx.us/app.

What you need to know before Army Basic Training

soldiers marching at basic training

The following is advice from Josh Hartmann and lists his tops tips that you need to know before shipping out to basic training. You can download the Sandboxx app before basic training here.

male and female army drill sergeants

Run

  • At least two miles/day. Regardless of how long it takes you.
  • Sing while running.
  • Every other day: Sprint 15 seconds, Jog 1 minute. Repeat.

Pushups

  • As many as you can in two minutes. Resting is okay, but keep three points of contact on the ground at all times.
  • Never touch knees.
  • Do them throughout the day. Not just once a day.
  • Never touch knees.
  • Do them throughout the day. Not just once a day.

Sit-ups

  • As many as you can in two minutes.
  • Use something to hold feet down.
  • Throughout the day.

Additional exercises

  • Flutter kicks
  • Mountain climbers
  • Overhead arm claps
  • Overhead arm raises
  • Jumping jacks
  • Iron cross (Hold arms out 90 degrees for as long as possible)
  • Up-Downs

army recruit crawling through obstacle course

Memorize

  • Army Song
  • Soldier’s Creed
  • Three General Orders
  • Warrior Ethos
  • Seven Army Values
  • Rank Structure
  • Military Time
  • Phonetic Alphabet

Practice Carrying A Weaponarmy drill sergeant with rifle at obstacle course

  • Wooden dowel or stick 100cm long
  • Attach weight to 9lbs
  • Never let it out of arm’s reach
  • Hold over your head for long periods with a heavy backpack on

Practice Road Marches

  • Long walks (minimum 3 miles) with heavy backpack on carrying practice weapon

army basic training road march

Eating

  • Three meals a day
  • As fast as you can
  • CUT ALL CAFFEINE FROM YOUR DIET NOW
  • Feet shoulder width apart directly in front of you
  • One hand on the table at a time
  • NO SNACKS. You don’t get to eat anything other than your three meals during basic.
  • Drink one glass water and one glass of gatorade with meals.

Sleep Schedule

  • In bed by 2100
  • Wake up for one hour during sleep (to simulate fireguard)
  • Read a book sitting up or pace a hallway, do NOTHING else.
  • Wake up by at 0400
  • Get a cheap digital watch with alarm function. Practice waking to it’s alarm.
  • Practice getting dressed in the dark as fast as you can

Shave

  • Your head: Not longer than a #3 clipper guard
  • Your face: Every day, no sideburns

 

Sandboxx is a mobile app that enables comms to exist throughout the military journey. Sandboxx enables those in uniform and their families stay connected like never before possible. Sandboxx Letters continues the mission by giving loved ones the ability to send physical mail to those in basic training, boot camp or on deployment. Learn more about how Sandboxx is revolutionising the way our military community thrives at www.sandboxx.us and download the app here,www.sandboxx.us/app.

What Your Son or Daughter Needs to Know Before Heading to Boot Camp

Aliyah Meehan, Director of Family Affairs, Proud Military Wife and Mother

So your child is heading to boot camp? There are countless emotions running through your mind as you preparing to send off your baby. We can agree that as parents we all want nothing more than our children to be healthy and successful at the goals and dreams they set for themselves. As a proud military wife and mom of three, I can certainly empathize with any parent during those few weeks leading up to the big day, and understand that you want to make sure your child is as prepared as possible for whatever lies outside the comforts of home.

Regardless of whether your child grew up in a military family or is a first generation military member, it is nearly impossible to be fully prepared for the physical and mental challenge of boot camp – and that’s ok. They’ve never done anything like this before. With that said, there are a few tips I would want to know before my firstborn walks out the door. Hopefully the following are lessons that you can share with your son or daughter to help them prepare for this very exciting and challenging chapter in their life.

1) Physical prep will put them ahead of the game

Physical conditioning is a big factor in boot camp. Surprisingly, many men and women go into training and are not physically prepared, resulting in undue stress. Therefore, encourage your child to start personal training ahead of time. This includes everything from push-ups, sit-ups, pull-ups and running. Believe it or not, there IS a proper way to do a military style push up. (See video below) Ultimately, this is one of the few things recruits can control and the more prepared they are physically, the less challenging the first few weeks of training will be and the more likely they will be to make it to graduation.

CLICK HERE TO SEE A PROPER PUSH UP

2) Ensure their financials are secure

While your child is off the grid, their personal bills will continue to come in per usual. Help your child to make sure these payments don’t fall behind. This is especially important since many military jobs require a Security Clearance, which often includes good financial standing. Without good financial standing, the government will consider them as a person of risk. If your child allows, help them out by keeping track of their credit score while they are away to look out for any red flags. It’s worth mentioning that they can always plan ahead by contacting their phone company, insurance provider, etc. and asking about automatic pay systems.

3) Have they defined their mission?

Simply put, basic training is meant to be challenging. It’s also just as much of a mental exercise as physical exercise. Therefore, encourage your child to deeply think about what brought them to the decision to enlist – whether that’s a good career, physical health or character building. In the hardest of times, their personal mission is the only thing that will keep them going.

4) Make sure they know that they will hit the ground running

There isn’t much time for your son or daughter to get acclimated to their surroundings, as basic training gets right down to business. They cut their hair and test their physical fitness standards all in the first 24 hours. That being said, instead of your child partying before they leave, it is a better decision to rest up and get plenty of sleep because first impressions are important. Remember…a drill sergeant never forgets! The truth is, the upcoming six weeks will likely be the toughest your child will ever experience in their life, but the reward, once they graduate, will be well worth the hard work and sacrifice for both them and you.

5) Leave the ego at the door

Once again, no matter what background your child comes from, once they arrive at bootcamp, they are no longer in charge of their own life. They are a member of the United States Armed Forces, and the sooner they realize and accept that, the sooner they will succeed. This is a great learning period – the fundamentals of their entire military career. Every moment at basic training is an important one, so encourage your child to walk through the door with an eager and open mind.

6) Communicate with your Recruit through Mailboxx

This is probably going to be the first time in your child’s life that they will not be able to instantly communicate with their friends and family back home. That’s right –Twitter, Snap Chat, Email, Facebook and Google Hangouts are no longer at their fingertips. They will soon come to realize that Mail Call is the best part of their day while they are off the grid. I also understand that you hardly have time to sit down at a desk and write physical letters anymore. That’s why we created Mailboxx.

Now while your child is away, family and friends can keep them updated on all the special moments taking place back home as quickly and easily as you would send a text message. Pictures and messages sent from smartphones back home will be converted into a physical letter that we, at team Sandboxx, will print out and send straight to your soldier’s Mail Call. The best part? Each Mailboxx includes a stamped and addressed return envelope making replies from them just as simple. CLICK HERE TO WATCH HOW IT WORKS.

We know you have already downloaded Sandboxx as you are reading this because, trust me, I know how hard those first few months without seeing his or her Facebook updates or hearing their voice can be, but be sure to spread the word to your family and friends too. Have everyone download Sandboxx before your Poolee leaves so that they can receive Mailboxx after Mailboxx to brighten their days and lend encouragement. We wish your Poolee the best of luck as they head off to boot camp, and thank you for supporting your child as they serve for our freedom.

We salute you,

Aliyah