6 Things To Memorize Before Army Basic Training (ABT)

Headed to Army Basic Training?

Basic training is an extremely stressful time. Sleep deprivation, physical exhaustion, and yelling instructions doesn’t exactly create the ideal study environment. Do yourself a favor by memorizing these 6 things to know and learn before Army Basic Training. By doing this, it should give you a few less things to worry about or the very least save yourself some pushup

How long is United States Marine Corps Recruit Training “Boot Camp”?

United States Marine Corps Recruit Training (also known as “boot camp”) is a 12 week program of initial training that each recruit must successfully complete in order to serve in the United States Marine Corps.

What’s After Marine Corps Recruit Training “Boot Camp”?

The next step after Marine Corps Recruit Training is School of Infantry (SOI).

SOI | Marine Combat Training Battalion (MCT) | Infantry Training Battalion’s (ITB)| Your Marines SOI Mailing Address:

School of Infantry (SOI) Company and Class Reference Guide

  1. Use these graduation dates charts below to find your Marine’s Company and Class.
  2. Once you’ve identified your Marine’s Company & Class information, click here for the mailing address.

 

SOI East Heading-1

School of Infantry (SOI) Mailing Addresses – East & West

Use your Marine’s class information found here to fill out their mailing address.
Make sure to check that you use the appropriate format. Mailing address are broke down by SOI East and SOI West. If your Marine is going to the East Coast you will use the SOI EAST format, if they are headed to the West Coast, please use the SOI West format. MCT and ITB each have their own mailing address so make sure you choose the appropriate format. If you need help figuring out your Marine’s mailing address please reach out to us and we would be happy to help! 💌

SOI East Heading-1

To send mail to your Marine at MCT EAST please use the following format

(Rank, Last Name, First Name, Mi)
Company________, Class__-__
Mct Bn, Soi-e, Mcb
Psc Box 20161
Camp Lejeune, Nc 28542-0161

Receiving Mail at Marine OCS: What You Need to Know

What Mail at OCS Means to Your Candidate

Mail at OCS is often the highlight of the day. Many candidates enjoy receiving sports scores, newsletters, newspaper clippings, etc.: anything they would have normally kept up with at home. Family and friends are encouraged to share fun stories, summer adventures, or jokes as this keeps candidates grounded and affords a moment of escape from the stress of OCS.

Building Mentor Relationships as You Transition to the Civilian Workforce

Feeling intimidated by your civilian job search?

LtCol Murphy reminds you to succeed in the civilian world like you did in the military–with the help of your mentors.

Sandboxx has teamed up with Betts Recruiting to help you smartly navigate your career transitions and avoid common pitfalls. Get helpful content, tailored for where you are in your military journey, each week in the Sandboxx app!

Twenty years has flown by.  It’s hard to believe that it’s over.  I am now sitting in my kitchen, enjoying terminal leave, and scratching the beard I’m finally allowed to grow.  All those years of mandatory shaving must have turned it white, because I’m certainly not that old yet.  Seriously…I’m not!  I’m young enough to start a second career and spend the next twenty, thirty, or even forty years following my new calling.  But I’m starting from scratch.  I’m the rookie in my new organization, and I’m more lost than a lieutenant with a compass.  Throughout my career, I’ve had mentors to keep me out of trouble and guide me through danger areas.  Who can I turn to now?

Marine Corps LtCol promotion ceremony flag
(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Kyle Welshans/Released) The appearance of U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) visual information does not imply or constitute DoD endorsement.

 

If you’ve had success in your military career, then you most likely have mentors that have guided and assisted you along the way, too.  Mentors can be invaluable.  Whether they have given you advice, taught you how things really work, or been your advocate and fought on your behalf, mentors play a huge role in the professional development of all service members.

But what about when you transition?  How will you find mentors in civilian life?  Here are a few tips for you to consider as you prepare to start fresh in a civilian career.

1. Just Because You Are Leaving the Military, Don’t Ignore Your Military Mentors

This may seem obvious, but many service members assume that their military mentors are of little or no value outside the military.  Nothing could be further from the truth, and for several reasons.  First, your military mentors will also transition someday – maybe even before you.  Second, you never know who they might know.  If you ask a military mentor for advice on a specific topic or career, he may not have all the answers, but he probably knows somebody that does.  Third, and most importantly, we often look to our mentors for general advice on life.  Your military mentor may not understand the nuances of your new career, but he understands leadership, balancing work with family, and a hundred other things that you might find useful.

2. Cast a Wide Net

Avoid target fixation when looking for mentors.  It would be great if you could build a relationship with the CEO, and by all means try, but be careful not to miss other opportunities.  Sometimes the best mentors are those that are just two or three rungs above you on the ladder.  These are the guys that remember what it was like to be you, because it wasn’t that long ago.  Not only do they remember how they advanced to their current level, but because it wasn’t three decades ago, there is a good chance that their methods are still effective.

The author on a mission in an unspecified location in the Middle East

You should also avoid focusing too narrowly on a specific skillset.  Your mentor does not need to be the mirror image of you.  In fact, a mentor from a different functional area within your industry may help provide you with insight and perspective that prove to be game changers in your professional development.

3.  Make Your Career Aspirations Known

People like to help people – it’s in our nature.  If you know what you want to do when you grow up, make it known!  Tell your friends, your family members, and that lady you always see at Starbucks.  Tell everyone.  Social media sites, especially LinkedIn, are excellent platforms to share your goals with many people at once.  (See our previous article entitled “LinkedIn Profile Advice for Transitioning Veterans”)  When you do, chances are, someone will know somebody in your chosen field.  When your neighbor says, “Hey, I know a guy…”, you politely ask your neighbor if he or she would be willing to introduce you.  This has the added benefit of getting a referral from your mutual friend, which makes the initial meeting easier.

And if you do not know what you want to do when you grow up, check out part one of this series, entitled “Navigating Your Military to Civilian Career Transition” for advice on how to choose a follow-on career.

4.  Join Professional Organizations and Groups

With the explosion of Social Media, there are organizations and groups for every combination of interests and locations imaginable.  If you are looking to connect with other left-handed fry-cooks in the Tri-State area, there is probably a group for that.  Once you join a group, don’t just read the articles!  Begin posting and look for replies.  Start individual conversations with people, and check their credentials on their personal profiles.

5.  Don’t Be Afraid to Cold-Call

Even though referrals are always best, many young professionals have picked up the telephone and cold-called the heavy-hitters in their field.  “Sir, my name is Robert, and I am starting a career in real estate.  I would love to ask you a few questions about how you became so successful.  Would you have twenty minutes that we could meet over coffee?”  Be polite, be flattering, and see what happens.  You may be surprised at who accepts your offer.  If you get that meeting, however, it’s up to you to turn those twenty minutes into a longer relationship.

6.  People Like to See Return on Investment

Mentoring is hard.  It consumes time and energy.  If a mentor invests the time to make you a better person, show them the fruits of their labor.  Check in periodically and provide career or life updates.  Don’t be the one that only calls when you need something.  You may not have much to offer in return, but at least show your gratitude.  Your mentor would not waste time on you if he or she didn’t think you were worth it.  Show them they’re right.  In the phrase “mentor relationship,” the more important word is relationship.  And one-way relationships never last.

Stay tuned: Download the Sandboxx App

Download the Sandboxx App for ten more pieces of advice to help you in your career. Our Sandboxx veterans and partners at Betts Recruiting, USAA, and the USO have all contributed to mentor people like you.

Get the advice automatically each week in your Sandboxx app.

Stay tuned to this series to:

  • Learn skills such as interviewing, networking and salary negotiation to help you achieve your career transition goals.
  • Be connected with civilian employers looking to hire Sandboxx veterans.

Download Sandboxx:

Sandboxx Google Play StoreGet Sandboxx for iOS

Gerald Murphy recently retired from the Marine Corps as a Lieutenant Colonel, and now serves as a full-time pastor and minister of the Gospel. He and his wife of 19 years live in Carlisle, PA with their four children. In addition to being a husband, father and pastor, Gerald enjoys cycling, hiking and rock-climbing.


SANDBOXX is a mobile app focused on connecting our military community.
Army | Navy | Marines | Air Force | Coast Guard

5 Networking Tips for Transitioning Careers

Feeling intimidated by your civilian job search?

So your online presence is strong with your LinkedIn profile and resume updated. Have you thought about how best to leverage your network for transition opportunities?

Sandboxx has teamed up with Betts Recruiting to help you smartly navigate your career transitions and avoid common pitfalls. Get helpful content, tailored for where you are in your military journey, each week in the Sandboxx app!

In any profession, networking is the best (and easiest) way to advance your career. Watch this 3-minute video to hear from a Harvard University representative about how to network through informational meetings.

There are countless ways to find professional communities and networking events in your ideal industry (check out Meetup and Eventbrite to get started). In reality, the phrase “network like a pro” means that you know both your “30-second professional story” inside and out, and how to maintain mutually beneficial relationships.

Here are 5 ways you can leverage networking opportunities to advance your career.

1 – What is your ask? What can you give? Networking events are very much “what can I do for you, what can you do for me” scenarios. To win this trade-off, go in with a clear idea about what you want to learn. Start by narrowing down the skills you have to offer from your military service or past life experiences. Your stories are powerful, and contain transferrable skills that you can use to demonstrate interest in a new career path.

2 – Do your research! Compare the expertise you have to offer, to that of the networking event organizers. Research the company and speakers participating in the event beforehand. What experience do they have on their LinkedIn profiles that you’d like to better understand? Familiarize yourself with the purpose of the event to get the most out of your time.

3 –  Ask questions! It is normal and beneficial to ask everyone questions at networking events. Don’t be afraid of being “that person” who interrupts a small group conversation to introduce themselves. Ask the group what brought them to the event, or why they are passionate about what they do. Most importantly, don’t go anywhere without getting their business card!

4 – Yes, this means you need business cards too. They are very affordable (try Vistaprint or Staples) and 100 cards are harder to give out than you think. Business cards are your reminder to follow up with each person the same day. At a minimum, request to connect with them on LinkedIn. If it makes sense, then follow up over email to ask for a coffee meeting to continue your conversation in a casual setting.

5 – Stay open-minded! Not every networking event or coffee meeting will lead to a job the next day. However, building your own network of people who are tuned into the industry is your strongest professional resource. Keep an open mind on how long it may take to find your next job. The saying “good people know good people” rings true for successfully navigating the job market.

Bonus Tip

Your military network can be your most valuable tool in your civilian job search. Use LinkedIn to see what second-degree connections you can be introduced to. Somebody still in the military might be the perfect friend to introduce you to a potential hiring manager–don’t overlook those connections!

Stay tuned: Download the Sandboxx App

Download the Sandboxx App for ten more pieces of advice to help you in your career. Our Sandboxx veterans and partners at Betts Recruiting, USAA, and the USO have all contributed to mentor people like you.

Get the advice automatically each week in your Sandboxx app.

Stay tuned to this series to:

  • Learn skills such as interviewing, networking and salary negotiation to help you achieve your career transition goals.
  • Be connected with civilian employers looking to hire Sandboxx veterans.

Download Sandboxx:

Sandboxx Google Play StoreGet Sandboxx for iOS

 

SlaySession #22 – Fan Friday

I went back and picked a few of your “favorite” workouts to make this week’s… Fan Friday workout. I hope you enjoy it as much as I do, knowing how much you probably won’t.

This week, my father told me a joke. It’s so bad it’s actually a little funny. “Why did the belt go to jail?… For holding up the pants.” Yes, I know it’s bad, but for him it’s a little funny.  For a little bit of context, he’s a police officer

Warm-up

Knees to Chest – 10 four count (Twice)

Bear Crawl – 15 yards (Twice)

Fire Hydrants – 15 Each Leg ( Twice)

Squat Drops – 15 total (Twice)

SlayTime

8 Count Body Builders w/ Burpee – 15 Total (Twice)

Inch Worm w/ Push-ups – 10 yards there and back (Twice)

15 mins of jogging at 75% speed – Distance doesn’t matter. What matters is that as soon as you’re done, you go right into the next workout.

Burpee Suicides – Exactly how it sounds… Amazing. Your goal is to reach the 25 yard line and back doing a total of 10 burpees with the traditional suicides.

Don’s special add-on: (Note: only if able to)

Give yourself 5 mins rest before attempting this. Do 15, 8-count Body Builders w/ Burpees, and then go right into a Burpee Suicide, except this time, go for 30 yards and 12 burpees.